Incredible images of Eyjafjallajokull’s volcano splendor; lightning, lava, and ash

Posted By: Selma Al-Faqih on April 20, 2010 8:38 pm

 

NASA’s Aqua satellite captured an Ash plume from Eyjafjallajokull Volcano over the North Atlantic

on April 17, 2010. The Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland erupted Wednesday, April 14, for the

second time this month.

 

NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/ / CC BY 2.0

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As reported by LiveScience.com, scientists have long known the plumes that shoot from the mouths of erupting volcanoes can produce sheaths of lightning. While lightning is typically associated with thunderstorms, hurricanes and other severe weather, the roiling debris clouds of volcanoes can also produce them.

The lighting in volcanic plumes is connected to the rotation that these plumes undergo, something like a tornado. As a plume rotates, it can spawn waterspouts or dust devils, which gather together the electric charges in the plume to form a sheath of lightning.

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This was the eruption between glaciers.  On the  right is Eyjafjallajökull now erupting about 30 times bigger bang. On the left is Katla, dormant for the moment, but will be much bigger if it is triggered.  Katla typically awakens every 80 years or so, and having last exploded in 1918 is now slightly overdue.

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This is at the first eruption at Fimmvörduháls.

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Note the little spectators.

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Volcano at Einhyrningur

 

 

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